Lotus

Lotus Posture (Padmasana) for Beginners

Lotus Posture Joey Miles

The iconic posture that so many students feel is the essence of being a yogi. Of course it isn’t it is just another posture, and not being able to do it won’t slow your journey to enlightenment. However if you can do it you can enjoy a comfy meditation seat. Luckily Joey Miles has some useful tips.

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Tips for the padmasana jump back?

Padmasana jump back

Sometimes you find yourself in lotus (padmasana) after coming out of a pose like for instance kukkutasana or supta vajrasana and land up untangling yourself to do a normal jumpback. There is a nice little transition that tidies all that up and in this video Mark Robberds shows you how as well

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Yin Yoga for Back bending with Ease and Grace

Kapotasana

Back bending with ease and grace requires that the Hip flexors (front of the hips), shoulders, and the whole of the front of the body are flexible and strong. Yin yoga is a way of opening the body with passive stretches held for a prolonged period of time. If practiced correctly it is a very sure and safe way to work on increased flexibility.

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Yin Yoga for Lotus Hips

Lotus

Padmasana or Lotus can be one of the most challenging and frustrating poses for a yoga practitioner. The ankles, knees and hip joints all have to be mobile and the muscles in the legs and the hip girdle have to be flexible. It is all too common for the knee to be injured trying to put the body in lotus before it is ready, so first a word of caution: take your time. There is no rush and it really doesn’t matter if you never ‘get’ Padmasana.

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Flexed or Extended Foot in Lotus

pigeon flexed feet

I’ve been hearing for years that we should flex our foot in various poses where we have our knees bent at ninety degrees or more. More recently I’ve received two seperate emails regarding the application of this technique to lotus posture. Should the foot be flexed or extended in padmasana? It’s time I throw in my own two-cents on this topic. As many of you know, I’m for whatever works. If it helps when you flex your foot, then the answer is flex your foot. But why does this work?

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Knees and Padmasana

Padmasana can cause various problems for yoga practitioners. Meniscus tears usually occur as a result of falls and accidents but in yoga they can be caused by incorrect functioning of the Popliteus and Semimembranosus (inner hamstring). Both of these muscles control rotational forces in the leg. The Popliteus muscle retracts the lateral meniscus, while the Semimembranosus retracts the medial meniscus, preventing the meniscus from being compressed and torn when the knee is flexed. Swelling or pain in this area can…

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